Mouse-sized Elephant Shrew Rediscovered in Africa (News) Scientists say they have rediscovered in Africa a small creature related to the elephant that disappeared about 50 years ago. Scientists say they have rediscovered in Africa a small creature related to the elephant that disappeared about 50 years ago. There are 20 species of sengis in the world, and the Somali sengi (.css-po6dm6-ItalicText{font-style:italic;}Elephantulus revoilii) is one of the most mysterious, known to science only from 39 individuals collected decades ago and stored in museums. 24 AUGUST 2020 . The team set up more than 1,250 traps filled with peanut butter, oatmeal and yeast extract in 12 areas in Djibouti, buoyed by speaking to local communities, where people could readily recognise the animals from photographs. Their findings prove that the Somali sengi "is currently extant" and lives far beyond the boundaries of Somalia, the researchers said in a study published in the journal PeerJ. The scientists plan to launch another expedition in 2022 to GPS radio-tag individual sengis to study their behaviour and ecology. For half a century scientists feared that the Somali elephant shrew had vanished from the face of the Earth. It is a sengi - a distant relation to aardvarks, elephants and manatees - the size of a mouse, with powerful legs that allow it to run at speeds of nearly 30 kilometres (20 miles) an hour. They caught one of the creatures in the first trap they set in the dry, rocky landscape of Djibouti. But Sengis, known as the elephant shrew, is only a few inches long, resembling a mouse, and it was lost to science for at least half a century – until being rediscovered in the Horn of Africa. Shares. FOUND: Romantically Monogamous, Mouse-sized Elephant-Shrew Rediscovered Dashing Around the Wilds of Djibouti. Lord of the Rings toad on brink of extinction, How everyday life has changed in Wuhan. The Somali elephant shrew has been rediscovered in Africa after being off the radar since 1968. Elephant shrew ‘lost’ to science for 52 years is ‘rediscovered’ in Africa. Image credits: zoofanatic. Scientists say they have rediscovered in Africa a small creature related to the elephant that disappeared about 50 years ago. The research mission was looking for different kinds of sengis in Djibouti, the small Horn of Africa coastal nation that borders Somalia, Ethiopia and Eritrea. A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites. They have distinctive trunk-like noses, which they use to feast on insects. The researchers collected twelve specimens of the mammal. The mammal has somehow dispersed across great distances over time, leaving biologists with a new puzzle. The Somali elephant shrew has been rediscovered in Africa after being off the radar since 1968. In total, they saw 12 sengis during their expedition and obtained the first-ever photos and video of live Somali elephant shrews for scientific documentation. By. 27. Somali sengi, also known as the elephant shrew, have been rediscovered in the wild after not having been observed since 1968. "All the local people knew about this, so it could not be rare in any way," said Heritage, the lead author of the study. 24 AUGUST 2020 . The last scientific record of the “lost species” of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings. This article is more than 1 month old . But during an expedition last year scientists found the animals still roaming the wild, discovering that the Somali sengi is not confined to Somalia at all. Tiny Elephant Shrews Have Been Rediscovered In Africa After Being Classed As A ‘Lost Species’ For The Last 50 Years. Elephant shrew rediscovered in Africa after 50 years. The elephant shrew was found in Djibouti, in East Africa, during a scientific expedition for the "lost species" which had not been seen since the 1970s, despite local sightings. © ScienceAlert Pty Ltd. All rights reserved. It is distantly related to elephants, aardvarks and manatees. The creature was found alive and well in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, during a scientific expedition. A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. Source: STEVEN HERITAGE. The Somali sengi (Elephantulus revoilii), known commonly as an elephant shrew, has been lost to science since 1968. Elephant shrew rediscovered after lost to science for 50 years. The mouse-sized animal, called the Somali sengi, is also known as an elephant-shrew. While its body is the shape and size of a mouse’s, it has spindly, gazelle-like legs that allow it to dart across boulders at breakneck speed. The team also included global elephant shrew expert Galen Rathburn, who had been studying the creatures for decades but had never seen a live Somali sengi, according to researcher Steven Heritage, of the Duke University Lemur Center. Kelsey Neam of Global Wildlife Conservation added: "Finding that the Somali sengi exists in the wild is the first step in conservation. The tiny Somali sengi is related to aardvarks, elephants and manatees. (AFP/Steven Heritage/Duke University/Global Wildlife Conservation). "For Djibouti this is an important story that highlights the great biodiversity of the country and the region and shows that there are opportunities for new science and research here," he said. 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The mouse-sized animal, called the Somali sengi, is also known as an elephant-shrew. "This is a welcome and wonderful rediscovery during a time of turmoil for our planet, and one that fills us with renewed hope for the remaining small mammal species on our most wanted list, such as the DeWinton's golden mole, a relative of the sengi, and the Ilin Island cloudrunner.". The creature was found alive and well in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, during a scientific expedition. It eats insects with its long, trunk-like nose and it mates for life. DNA analysis shows that the Somali sengi is most closely related to other species from as far away as Morocco and South Africa, placing it in a new genus. Tiny elephant shrew species, missing for 50 years, rediscovered. It had been lost to science since 1968, but was recently rediscovered. It's actually more closely related to elephants than true shrews, and it takes its name from the fact that it has a very long nose which it uses to suck up ants. Strange, 'Long-Lost' Elephant Shrew Has Been Rediscovered in Africa After 50 Years . For half a century scientists feared that the Somali elephant shrew had vanished from the face of the Earth. No one had seen so much as a whisker. "Usually when we rediscover lost species, we find just one or two individuals and have to act quickly to try to prevent their imminent extinction," said Robin Moore of Global Wildlife Conservation. By CFACT | 2020-09-01T23:33:29-04:00 September 2nd, 2020 | General Information | Comments Off on Elephant shrew rediscovered after lost to science for 50 years. "Usually when we rediscover lost species, we find just one or two individuals and have to act quickly to try to prevent their imminent extinction," said Robin Moore. A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. Elephant shrew ‘lost’ to science for 52 years is ‘rediscovered’ in Africa. The creature was found alive and well in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, during a scientific expedition. The scientists had heard reports of sightings in Djibouti, and Houssein Rayaleh, a Djiboutian research ecologist and conservationist who joined the trip, believed he had seen the animal before. Before now, the Somali sengi was last documented 52 years ago in 1962. Elephant shrews, or sengis, are neither elephants nor shrews, but related to aardvarks, elephants and manatees. Scientists working in the Horn of Africa have documented the existence of a remarkable little mammal called the Somali elephant shrew -- or Somali sengi -- for the first time since the 1970s. AMéLIE BOTTOLLIER-DEPOIS, AFP . As a result, researchers recommended that the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) reappraise its classification for the Somali sengi on its list of vulnerable creatures, from "Data Deficient" to "Least Concern". "Our interviews with local nomadic and pastoralist people indicated that they see sengis regularly and we were consistently told the same common name (Wali sandheer)," said Houssein Rayaleh, of Association Djibouti Nature, who was on the team. The speedy Somali sengi had been lost to science until an expedition to Djibouti. The Somali sengi (Elephantulus revoilii), known commonly as an elephant shrew, has been lost to science since 1968. The Global Wildlife Conservation group even included it on its "25 most wanted lost species" list. .css-14iz86j-BoldText{font-weight:bold;}A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. The Somali sengi is one of the 25 "most wanted lost species" of the charity, Global Wildlife Conservation. A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. .css-8h1dth-Link{font-family:ReithSans,Helvetica,Arial,freesans,sans-serif;font-weight:700;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;color:#FFFFFF;}.css-8h1dth-Link:hover,.css-8h1dth-Link:focus{-webkit-text-decoration:underline;text-decoration:underline;}Read about our approach to external linking. But no one knew whether they were the long-lost Somali sengi. EU sets out plans in case Brexit trade talks fail, In Trump’s final days, a rush of federal executions, How everyday life has changed in Wuhan. It is distantly related to elephants, aardvarks and manatees. VideoI May Destroy You star supports black hair code, Beauty professionals hope for a prettier picture. Rediscovery of the Somali Sengi, One of Global Wildlife Conservation’s 25 Most Wanted Lost Species, Delights and Surprises Mammal Biologists. (AFP/Steven Heritage/Duke University/Global Wildlife Conservation). Share Share on twitter. Read about our approach to external linking. But the tiny mammal with its probing trunk-like nose was quietly thriving in the arid, rocky landscape of the Horn of Africa, researchers said Tuesday. Elephant shrew ‘lost’ to science for 52 years is ‘rediscovered’ in Africa. After remaining unseen to scientists for 50 years, this tiny Somali sengi, or elephant shrew, has been rediscovered living in Djibouti. 41. by Elizabeth Claire Alberts on 18 August 2020 . "So when he opened the first trap and looked over at me, and he had seen the cute tufted furry tail of the animal and he looked at me and said 'I can't believe it, I've never seen one before'," Heritage told AFP. Now that we know it survives, scientists and conservationists will be able to ensure it never disappears again.". The Somali sengi is a small, mouse-sized species of the Elephant shrew that was last documented by scientists in 1968. Share It might sound shocking, but 2020 hasn’t been all terribly wrong. The scientists had heard reports of mysterious sightings in Djibouti, so they decided to go there and see for themselves. Tiny Elephant Shrew Species Rediscovered After 50 Years Thought lost to science, the Somali sengi elephant shrew has been rediscovered in the Horn of Africa. No one had seen so much as a whisker. August 28, 2020 August 28, 2020 Supertrooper Causes, News, Wildlife. 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A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. A mouse-sized elephant shrew has been rediscovered in Djibouti in Africa after being missing for 50 years. The last scientific record of the "lost species" of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings. Elephant shrew rediscovered after lost to science for 50 years Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow-September 02, 2020. Adorably weird elephant-shrew rediscovered after 50 years lost to science. Image credits: Smithsonian’s National Zoo. "We did not know which species occurred in Djibouti and when we saw the diagnostic feature of a little tufted tail, we looked at each other and we knew that it was something special.". No one had seen so much as a whisker. The team, which plans a new expedition to learn more about the species, believes the sengi could be living across Somalia, Djibouti and Ethiopia. Other species rediscovered in recent years include Jackson's climbing salamander in Guatemala, the Wallace's giant bee in Indonesia, and the silver-backed chevrotain - a deer-like species the size of a rabbit - in Vietnam. AMéLIE BOTTOLLIER-DEPOIS, AFP . A sengis, Assamo, Republic of Djibouti, February 2019. Elephant shrew rediscovered in Horn of Africa after 50 years . The Somali sengi has been lost to science since the 1970s, leaving just the 39 preserved specimens held in the world's natural history museums as the only physical evidence that it ever existed. Tiny Elephant Shrew Species Rediscovered After 50 Years Thought lost to science, the Somali sengi elephant shrew has been rediscovered in the Horn of Africa. Image credits: Mallory Lindsay. The elephant shrew is a tiny mouse that roams the African prairie and has a long tail and trunk like nose. The number of new cases is surging and hospitals in parts of the country are filling up. A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. Video, Grief: 'Everything looks the same, but it isn't' Video, Grief: 'Everything looks the same, but it isn't', I May Destroy You star supports black hair code. A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. The Somali sengi, an elephant shrew that seemingly vanished the face of the Earth 52 years ago, has been rediscovered. 0. The team set more than 1,000 traps at 12 locations, baiting the traps with a concoction of peanut butter, oatmeal and yeast. Detained Canadians in China get rare consular access . The last scientific record of the "lost species" of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings. But Sengis, known as the elephant shrew, is only a few inches long, resembling a mouse, and it was lost to science for at least half a century – until being rediscovered in the Horn of Africa. But it has recently been re-discovered and now conservationists are finding out new things about its traits and habits. Rathbun died of cancer shortly after the expedition. Image copyright Steven Heritage Image caption The animal is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand . irina-18.08.2020. "And its habitats are not threatened by agriculture and human development, in a very arid environment where there is no foreseeable future for agriculture.". Strange, 'Long-Lost' Elephant Shrew Has Been Rediscovered in Africa After 50 Years . But it has recently been re-discovered and … The conservationist said he too had seen sengis during his 21 years doing fieldwork in the country. The elusive, insect-eating creature is neither an elephant nor a shrew. Share on facebook. For half a century scientists feared that the Somali elephant shrew had vanished from the face of the Earth. He said while people living in Djibouti never considered the sengis to be "lost", the new research brings the Somali sengi back into the scientific community, which is valued. But the tiny mammal with its probing trunk-like nose was quietly thriving in the arid, rocky landscape of the … They did not observe any immediate threats to the species' habitat, which is inaccessible and far from farming and human developments. ... (Elephantulus revoilii), a small mammal related to the elephant, was recently “rediscovered” in Djibouti. The scientists had to set around 1000 traps at 12 different locations to capture these beauties. In addition to their rediscovery, scientists were surprised to learn of the species abundance in Djibouti. Steven Heritage, a research scientist at the Duke University Lemur Center in Durham, US, and a member of the expedition to the Horn of Africa in 2019, said he was thrilled to put the species "back on the radar". The species was previously known only from Somalia, hence its name. Offbeat Agence France-Presse ‘Long-lost’ elephant shrew rediscovered after 50 years Josh K. Elliott. The research is published in the journal Peer J. © 2020 BBC. The tiny creature mates for life and despite its small stature, is known to reach speeds of up to 30 km/h. And while they cannot estimate the size of the population, they believe the sengi is thriving. The elephant shrew was found in Djibouti, in East Africa, during a scientific expedition for the "lost species" which had not been seen since the 1970s, despite local sightings. The abundance of the species seems similar to other elephant shrews and its range may extend beyond Somalia into Djibouti and possibly Ethiopia. The Somali elephant shrew, or the Somali sengi, is related to aardvarks, elephants and manatees but is only a few inches in size. The last scientific record of the "lost species" of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings. Scientists found the mouse-sized animal in the Horn of Africa after it had gone undocumented by researchers for over half a century, according to a report from The Guardian. 2020-08-19. Video, I May Destroy You star supports black hair code, Gwyneth Paltrow says she 'fell out of love with acting', Covid-19: The mask-wearing US city that bucked the trend, Elon Musk's Starship prototype makes a big impact, Brexit: EU sets out plans in case trade talks with UK fail, Beirut explosion: Lebanon's caretaker PM 'charged with negligence', Joe Biden's son Hunter says he is under investigation over taxes, Afghanistan violence: Journalist Malala Maiwand shot dead along with her driver, The dead professor and the vast pro-India disinformation campaign. Image credits: zoofanatic. .css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:link{color:inherit;}.css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:visited{color:#696969;}.css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:link,.css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:visited{-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:link:hover,.css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:visited:hover,.css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:link:focus,.css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:visited:focus{color:#B80000;-webkit-text-decoration:underline;text-decoration:underline;}.css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:link::after,.css-1hlxxic-PromoLink:visited::after{content:'';position:absolute;top:0;right:0;bottom:0;left:0;z-index:2;}Lord of the Rings toad on brink of extinction, US records highest daily death toll of pandemic. He told the BBC: "We were really excited and elated when we opened the first trap that had an elephant shrew in it, a Somali sengi. Despite its formidable-sounding name, the Somali elephant shrew or sengi is tiny. "Without formal documentation, the species of the sengis in Djibouti was unknown," Rayaleh told AFP. VideoHow everyday life has changed in Wuhan, Unlikely friendships forged through Covid, Grief: 'Everything looks the same, but it isn't' VideoGrief: 'Everything looks the same, but it isn't', The mask-wearing city that bucked the trend, The Syrians used as 'cannon fodder' in Nagorno-Karabakh, I May Destroy You star supports black hair code. By Helen Briggs Wednesday August 19, 2020 The animal is small enough to fit in the palm of your hand.STEVEN HERITAGE . The Somali sengi is a strange amalgamation of creatures. Adorably weird elephant-shrew rediscovered after 50 years lost to science. This adorable little baby was found safe and sound in Djibouti, a country in the Horn of Africa, by a group of scientists. The last scientific record of the “lost species” of elephant shrew was in the 1970s, despite local sightings. Elephant shrew rediscovered in Africa after 50 years A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. Share Share on pinterest. Tiny elephant shrew species rediscovered in Africa after 50 years. The tiny Somali sengi is related to aardvarks, elephants and manatees. Moore said this raises hope for those species still thought to be "lost", including the Ilin Island cloudrunner, a cloud rat from a single island in the Philippines. A little-known mammal related to an elephant but as small as a mouse has been rediscovered in Africa after 50 years of obscurity. The Somali sengi was rediscovered in August after being missing for over 50 years. By Helen BriggsBBC Environment correspondent. Long 'Lost' Elephant Shrew Rediscovered In Africa After 50 Years The elusive, insect-eating creature is neither an elephant nor a shrew.

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